Tag Archives: market strategies

Luv for Herb Kelleher

Herb KelleherHerb Kelleher, Co-Founder of Southwest Airlines, passed away on January 3, 2019.  He was considered a pioneer in the aviation industry and one of the most transformative business leaders of all time.   The tributes have poured out from employees, friends and other business leaders over the past month.   The NextLevel Team “luvs” everything Kelleher stood for and is paying tribute to the great leader this month.

While there are several Herb Kelleher quotes that motivate and inspire us, we chose to feature the following as this month’s Thoughts the Count.

“It is my practice to try to understand how valuable something is by trying to imagine myself without it.” -Herb Kelleher

Forbes shared a list of “20 Reasons Why Herb Kelleher Was One Of The Most Beloved Leaders Of Our Time” last month and #13 touched on what Herb valued most as a business leader: his employees.

“Thousands of requests for speaking engagements, presidential commissions, legislative issues, and business meetings related to the airline industry all vied for Herb Kelleher’s time. But Herb’s priorities were always the people of Southwest Airlines. Ask Vickie Shuler, Herb’s executive assistant of 30 years, and she will tell you that Herb would not change his schedule if a business meeting came up that interfered with an employee event he promised to attend.”

“If you want to know what someone truly values watch the way they spend their money and their time. It’s easy for executives to say ‘people are our most important asset,’ but reallocating their time to support that statement is yet another story. During the filming of a customer service video, Tom Peters asked Herb what advice he would give other executives. Herb said, ‘Stop spending so much time with other CEOs, spend more time with your people.'”

This month we challenge you to consider where you place value and “luv” in your life. Consider both your personal and business relationships and take a moment to reflect on the legacy of Herb Kelleher.

2019 Super Bowl Round Up – The Hits and Misses

Last year we shared Ad Age’s top Super Bowl ads rated by effectiveness, entertainment and the overall combination. This year we’ve asked the NextLevel Account Mangers to weigh in.

Kristen Dyson

“My favorite was the Amazon clip featuring Harrison Ford. Mostly because I’m a huge Harrison Ford fan, but also because it was cute and a creative way to draw attention to Alexa and its capabilities.”

“I did not care for the TurboTax Live robo-child commercial, simply because it was creepy and weird and made me uncomfortable.”

Katie Buchanan

“This heartwarming commercial shows the power of Google Translate. They show clips of people from all over the world interacting with people from different backgrounds and cultures. Out of all the 100 Billion words translated per day, the most translated words in the world are ‘how are you?’, ‘Thank you’ and ‘I love you’. We love this commercial because it unites us as human beings! “

“Burger King’s Super Bowl commercial featuring Andy Warhol was very strange. The clip was taken from the 1982 film Scenes of America. The commercial ended with the hashtag #eatlikeandy. The commercial left us confused and not tempted to go to Burger King. “

Tara Lockhart

“Audi nailed it with their ad this year. As it opened, I thought of Field of Dreams and thought we were destined for another heartfelt message. Once the star of the commercial, the cashew, came into play, I died laughing. Audi kept us engaged and who wouldn’t want to drive an Audi e-tron?”

“Mint Mobile’s ‘Crunchy Milk’ commercial was the worst ad that aired. While the commercial was memorable, because it completely grossed us all out, we couldn’t remember what they were advertising. Keep in mind, they paid upwards of $5 million for 30 seconds of airtime. I’m sure they could have come up with a more effective ad spend.”

You might be asking yourself, “Where is Eric Poerschke’s pick?” It seems that at least one of us actually watched the Super Bowl for the football and used the commercial breaks to hit the buffet and bathroom.

 

Die Young, As Late As Possible

December 2018 Thoughts that Count: 

“I once heard it said of man that the idea is to die young, as late as possible.” — {Former President George W. Bush in the eulogy for his father, President George H. W. Bush}

Former President George W. Bush delivered an emotional eulogy about his father, former president George H.W. Bush, during his funeral at the National Cathedral in Washington on December 5th.

The following is a transcript of his remarks, as distributed by George W. Bush’s office and lightly edited by The New York Times.

FORMER PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: Distinguished guests, including our presidents and first ladies, government officials, foreign dignitaries, and friends: Jeb, Neil, Marvin, Doro, and I, and our families, thank you all for being here.

I once heard it said of man that “the idea is to die young as late as possible.”

At age 85, a favorite pastime of George H.W. Bush was firing up his boat, the Fidelity, and opening up the three-300 horsepower engines to fly — joyfully fly — across the Atlantic, with Secret Service boats straining to keep up.

At 90, George H.W. Bush parachuted out of an aircraft and landed on the grounds of St. Ann’s by the Sea in Kennebunkport, Maine — the church where his mom was married and where he’d worshiped often. Mother liked to say he chose the location just in case the chute didn’t open.

In his 90’s, he took great delight when his closest pal, James A. Baker, smuggled a bottle of Grey Goose vodka into his hospital room. Apparently, it paired well with the steak Baker had delivered from Morton’s.

To his very last days, Dad’s life was instructive. As he aged, he taught us how to grow old with dignity, humor, and kindness — and, when the good Lord finally called, how to meet him with courage and with joy in the promise of what lies ahead.

One reason Dad knew how to die young is that he almost did it — twice. When he was a teenager, a staph infection nearly took his life. A few years later he was alone in the Pacific on a life raft, praying that his rescuers would find him before the enemy did.

God answered those prayers. It turned out he had other plans for George H.W. Bush. For Dad’s part, I think those brushes with death made him cherish the gift of life. And he vowed to live every day to the fullest.

Dad was always busy — a man in constant motion — but never too busy to share his love of life with those around him. He taught us to love the outdoors. He loved watching dogs flush a covey. He loved landing the elusive striper. And once confined to a wheelchair, he seemed happiest sitting in his favorite perch on the back porch at Walker’s Point contemplating the majesty of the Atlantic. The horizons he saw were bright and hopeful. He was a genuinely optimistic man. And that optimism guided his children and made each of us believe that anything was possible.

He continually broadened his horizons with daring decisions. He was a patriot. After high school, he put college on hold and became a Navy fighter pilot as World War II broke out. Like many of his generation, he never talked about his service until his time as a public figure forced his hand. We learned of the attack on Chichi Jima, the mission completed, the shoot-down. We learned of the death of his crewmates, whom he thought about throughout his entire life. And we learned of his rescue.

And then, another audacious decision; he moved his young family from the comforts of the East Coast to Odessa, Texas. He and Mom adjusted to their arid surroundings quickly. He was a tolerant man. After all, he was kind and neighborly to the women with whom he, Mom and I shared a bathroom in our small duplex — even after he learned their profession — ladies of the night.

Dad could relate to people from all walks of life. He was an empathetic man. He valued character over pedigree. And he was no cynic. He looked for the good in each person — and usually found it.

Dad taught us that public service is noble and necessary; that one can serve with integrity and hold true to the important values, like faith and family. He strongly believed that it was important to give back to the community and country in which one lived. He recognized that serving others enriched the giver’s soul. To us, his was the brightest of a thousand points of light.

In victory, he shared credit. When he lost, he shouldered the blame. He accepted that failure is part of living a full life, but taught us never to be defined by failure. He showed us how setbacks can strengthen.

None of his disappointments could compare with one of life’s greatest tragedies, the loss of a young child. Jeb and I were too young to remember the pain and agony he and Mom felt when our 3-year-old sister died. We only learned later that Dad, a man of quiet faith, prayed for her daily. He was sustained by the love of the almighty and the real and enduring love of our mom. Dad always believed that one day he would hug his precious Robin again.

He loved to laugh, especially at himself. He could tease and needle, but never out of malice. He placed great value on a good joke. That’s why he chose Simpson to speak. On email, he had a circle of friends with whom he shared or received the latest jokes. His grading system for the quality of the joke was classic George Bush. The rare 7s and 8s were considered huge winners — most of them off-color.

George Bush knew how to be a true and loyal friend. He honored and nurtured his many friendships with his generous and giving soul. There exist thousands of handwritten notes encouraging, or sympathizing, or thanking his friends and acquaintances.

He had an enormous capacity to give of himself. Many a person would tell you that Dad became a mentor and a father figure in their life. He listened and he consoled. He was their friend. I think of Don Rhodes, Taylor Blanton, Jim Nantz, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and perhaps the unlikeliest of all, the man who defeated him, Bill Clinton. My siblings and I refer to the guys in this group as “brothers from other mothers.”

He taught us that a day was not meant to be wasted. He played golf at a legendary pace. I always wondered why he insisted on speed golf. He was a good golfer.

Well, here’s my conclusion: He played fast so that he could move on to the next event, to enjoy the rest of the day, to expend his enormous energy, to live it all. He was born with just two settings: full throttle, then sleep.

He taught us what it means to be a wonderful father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. He was firm in his principles and supportive as we began to seek our own ways. He encouraged and comforted, but never steered. We tested his patience — I know I did — but he always responded with the great gift of unconditional love.

Last Friday, when I was told he had minutes to live, I called him. The guy who answered the phone said, “I think he can hear you, but hasn’t said anything most of the day. I said, “Dad, I love you, and you’ve been a wonderful father.” And the last words he would ever say on earth were, “I love you, too.”

(December 5, 2018, The New York Times)

Missing Ingredients In Your Email Marketing Strategy

“Building an effective email marketing strategy is like laying a trail of breadcrumbs. But how do you keep your audience following along all the way to where you want them to go? And how do you get their attention in the first place? ”

According to Andy Walker, Founder of Cyberwalker Digital and email marketing expert, “The return on investment is better than any other technique to reach customers. And it works for brand building and generating direct sales.”

Walker discusses the importance of having magnets and ice cream within your email marketing strategy.  “A lead magnet attracts your audience and pulls them in, just like an actual magnet would.” What are you using for lead magnets?   Do you offer tip sheets, eBooks, videos, webinars, other premiums?  The key to developing a good lead magnet is understanding your customer paint point.

Walker later explains that once you’ve captured the lead, you need to offer something “as sweet as ice cream” to lock them in.  Walker is referring to the solution to your customer’s problem.  If you consistently identify their problems, large or small, and provide a solution you will build trust and brand loyalty.

For more on this topic, read the full article.

Boosting B2B Email Open Rates

Looking for tips to boost your B2B email open rates?

Boost B2B Open Rates

“Crafting beautiful emails full of useful content and calls to action is not enough on its own. If your emails do not get opened, you are wasting your time.”

In his article, Errington covers the following four BIG topics with easy and practical advice:

  1. Getting the Subject Line Right
  2. Optimize the Preview Text
  3. Make It Mobile
  4. Write for Mobile

Click to read the full article for Keith Errington’s tips.

Email Metrics: Consumers are Opening More Emails and Clicking

What do your email metrics look like?

The Data and Marketing Association published interesting emails statistics earlier this year.  “Business-to-consumer emails are much more likely to be opened – with a 19.7% open rate compared to 15.1% for business-to-business (B2B). But, B2B has a higher engagement rate once opened, with a click-through rate of 3.2% compared to 2.1% for consumer emails.”

DMA Email Stats 2018

 

Take the time to review your email metrics on a monthly basis to ensure that your marketing emails are performing.

You can read the full article here.

Encouraging You to Find Your Edge by Failing!

September 2018, Thoughts That Count – Find the Edge!

“People who take huge risks aren’t afraid to fail. In fact, they love to fail. It’s because failing means they found the edge.”

— {Bob Goff, excerpt from Love Does}

More from Love Does:

the edge

Continue reading Encouraging You to Find Your Edge by Failing!

So, Always Be That Person That You Want To Meet!

August 2018 Thoughts That Count
Be that person…”Be the type of person you want to meet!”

{Anonymous} Continue reading So, Always Be That Person That You Want To Meet!

5 Fascinating Jobs That Don’t Exist – Yet

This month’s article is about future jobs that we haven”t considered before.  We can’t help but consider how these new positions might change the face of marketing practices, too.

In June, Adobe’s CMO.com launched a series of articles about the future of work. Each article was interesting, but we found Nikki Majewski’s worth talking about. They “sifted through the predictions and uncovered five of what we think are the most interesting jobs set to emerge in the APAC region. Each one requires its own exciting collaboration of skills and expertise. Some are close to becoming a reality, while others will come as technology crosses new barriers.”

Artificial Intelligence

Read the full article for details on each of the futuristic jobs.

It’s Okay to Disagree!

It's Okay to Disagree!

July Thoughts That Count:

It is certainly okay to disagree.  Dudley Field Malone said, “I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me.”

Continue reading It’s Okay to Disagree!

Happy 4th of July!

Happy 4th of July from all of us at the NextLevel Thinking team! We hope your holiday is safe, fun, and full patriotic spirit!

NLT 4th of July

“I believe in America because we have great dreams, and because we have the opportunity to make those dreams come true.” -Wendell Willkie

Revitalizing Trust in Marketing

Trust in marketing

Prince Harry and Megan Markle’s wedding isn’t the only interesting news coming out of Great Britain this month.  Marketing Week published an interesting article from London-based Mention Me CEO, Andy Cockburn, highlighting the consumer decline in social media trust and avenues to grow brand trust.

At NextLevel Thinking we wholeheartedly agree with the first suggestion:  “One of the simplest ways businesses can get started with trust marketing is to launch a referral programme. Referral is an excellent way for brands to develop their relationships with existing customers; meanwhile, new ones are introduced in a way that maximises the potential for future trust.”

Read the full article to learn more about fostering trust in this “changing environment.”

(Keep in mind: this article was published in the United Kingdom, so the spelling is a bit different.)

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