Tag Archives: Houston marketing firm

Happy Halloween!

Halloween

“I gave you life.  You give me your Reese’s.
That’s the deal.”     -Every Mom & Dad on Halloween
Halloween NLT Kids
We hope the tricks are fun and the treats are sweet!
Happy Halloween!
The NLT Team​​​​​​​
(Clockwise from Top: Erin, Trey, and Kyle Poerschke; Nolan and Bo Dyson; Gentry and Landry Kate Lockhart)

Hashtag Challenge: Use a Hashtag on LinkedIn

The NLT Team is issuing a hashtag challenge this month, because last month’s articles on hashtags garnered quite a few clicks.  If you missed them, here they are again:

How to Effectively Use Hashtags on LinkedIn

And the following how to video by Jade Pluck:

 

In response to last month’s interest in hashtags, the NLT Team would like to challenge you to use a hashtag on LinkedIn.  Not sure which hashtag to use?  Take a look at the list put together by Ghost Blog Writers for suggestions to get started:

  1. #business
  2. #work
  3. #office
  4. #success
  5. #quotes
  6. #inspiration
  7. #entrepreneur
  8. #life
  9. #love
  10. #happy
  11. #HR
  12. #jobs
  13. #marketing
  14. #sales
  15. #leadership
  16. #tips
  17. #influencer
  18. #successful
  19. #worklife
  20. #officelife

Source: Ghost Writers Blog

What is a hashtag?

What is a hashtag? You’ve probably noticed a rise in #hashtags over the last few years, but do you understand what they are and how to use them?

hashtags

“The first use of hashtags was in 2007 and created by online users to discuss specific events and relevant issues and was posted on Twitter. Now we use them to follow current events, industry trends, niche conversations, research and to grow influence. If used both properly and thoughtfully, hashtags can elevate you and your brand.”  This article from Business 2 Community defines hashtags and explains how to effectively use them on LinkedIn.

Encouraging You to Find Your Edge by Failing!

September 2018, Thoughts That Count – Find the Edge!

“People who take huge risks aren’t afraid to fail. In fact, they love to fail. It’s because failing means they found the edge.”

— {Bob Goff, excerpt from Love Does}

More from Love Does:

the edge

Continue reading Encouraging You to Find Your Edge by Failing!

Happy Labor Day!

Labor Day 2

1. The idea first became public in 1882. In September 1882, the unions of New York City decided to have a parade to celebrate their members being in unions, and to show support for all unions. At least 20,000 people were there, and the workers had to give up a day’s pay to attend. There was also a lot of beer involved in the event.

2. The New York parade inspired other unions. Other regions started having parades, and by 1887, Oregon, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, and Colorado made Labor Day a state holiday.

3. How did the Haymarket Affair influence Labor Day? On May 4, 1886, a bomb exploded at a union rally in Chicago’s Haymarket Square, which led to violence that killed seven police officers and four others. The incident also led to May 1 being celebrated in most nations as Workers Day. The U.S. government chose Labor Day instead to avoid a celebration on May 1 and New York’s unions had already picked the first Monday in September for their holiday.

4. Two people with similar names are credited with that first New York City event. Matthew Maguire, a machinist, and Peter McGuire, a carpenter, have been linked to the 1882 parade. The men were from rival unions; in 2011, Linda Stinson, a former U.S. Department of Labor’s historian, said she didn’t know which man should be credited – partially because people over the years confused them because of their similar-sounding names.

5. Grover Cleveland helped make Labor Day a national holiday. After violence related to the Pullman railroad strike, President Cleveland and lawmakers in Washington wanted a federal holiday to celebrate labor – and not a holiday celebrated on May 1. Cleveland signed an act in 1894 establishing the federal holiday; most states had already passed laws establishing a Labor Day holiday by that point. Sen. James Henderson Kyle of South Dakota introduced S. 730 to make Labor Day a federal legal holiday on the first Monday of September. It was approved on June 28, 1894.

6. The holiday has evolved over the years. In the late 19th century, celebrations focused on parades in urban areas. Now the holiday is a celebration that honors organized labor with fewer parades, and more activities. It also marks the perceived end of the summer season.

7. Can you wear white after Labor Day? This old tradition goes back to the late Victorian era, where it was a fashion faux pas to wear any white clothing after the summer officially ended on Labor Day. The tradition isn’t really followed anymore. EmilyPost.com explains the logic behind the fashion trend – white indicated you were still in vacation mode at your summer cottage.

8. Labor Day is the unofficial end of Hot Dog season. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council says that between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Americans will eat 7 billion hot dogs.

9. How many people are union members today? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 14.8 million union members in the workforce in 2017. There were 17.7 million in 1983.

10. What is the biggest union today? The National Education Association has about 3 million people who are members, including inactive and lifetime members.

Values: Are your company’s unique? Do they differentiate your company from your competitors?

Core values are extremely important in launching and maintaining business success.  At NextLevel Thinking, we have had the privilege of helping many clients identify and define the values that make them unique.  Core values aren’t only important to your internal culture, they should also be considered in your positioning.  How can you position your company, products and services if you haven’t identified what sets your company apart from the competition?  Core values serve as a lens through which each marketing activity, piece of collateral, and idea must be filtered.Company core values highlight what makes you unique.

This month, we are sharing Denise Lee Yohn’s article, “Ban These 5 Words From Your Corporate Values Statement.” The article was published in the Harvard Business Review earlier this year.  We encourage each of you to read the article and take a hard look at your current company values.  Are you using the five words banned by Yohn?  We agree completely with Yohn: “Differentiation is the key driver of brand power. Your company’s core values must embody what makes your company uniquely ‘you’— what makes you stand out from others.”

NextLevel Thinking is here to help you define what makes you uniquely “you” and position your company, products and services in the marketplace.

So, Always Be That Person That You Want To Meet!

August 2018 Thoughts That Count
Be that person…”Be the type of person you want to meet!”

{Anonymous} Continue reading So, Always Be That Person That You Want To Meet!

5 Fascinating Jobs That Don’t Exist – Yet

This month’s article is about future jobs that we haven”t considered before.  We can’t help but consider how these new positions might change the face of marketing practices, too.

In June, Adobe’s CMO.com launched a series of articles about the future of work. Each article was interesting, but we found Nikki Majewski’s worth talking about. They “sifted through the predictions and uncovered five of what we think are the most interesting jobs set to emerge in the APAC region. Each one requires its own exciting collaboration of skills and expertise. Some are close to becoming a reality, while others will come as technology crosses new barriers.”

Artificial Intelligence

Read the full article for details on each of the futuristic jobs.

It’s Okay to Disagree!

It's Okay to Disagree!

July Thoughts That Count:

It is certainly okay to disagree.  Dudley Field Malone said, “I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me.”

Continue reading It’s Okay to Disagree!

Happy 4th of July!

Happy 4th of July from all of us at the NextLevel Thinking team! We hope your holiday is safe, fun, and full patriotic spirit!

NLT 4th of July

“I believe in America because we have great dreams, and because we have the opportunity to make those dreams come true.” -Wendell Willkie

Revitalizing Trust in Marketing

Trust in marketing

Prince Harry and Megan Markle’s wedding isn’t the only interesting news coming out of Great Britain this month.  Marketing Week published an interesting article from London-based Mention Me CEO, Andy Cockburn, highlighting the consumer decline in social media trust and avenues to grow brand trust.

At NextLevel Thinking we wholeheartedly agree with the first suggestion:  “One of the simplest ways businesses can get started with trust marketing is to launch a referral programme. Referral is an excellent way for brands to develop their relationships with existing customers; meanwhile, new ones are introduced in a way that maximises the potential for future trust.”

Read the full article to learn more about fostering trust in this “changing environment.”

(Keep in mind: this article was published in the United Kingdom, so the spelling is a bit different.)

Source 

5 Secrets to Use Storytelling for Brand Marketing Success

Brand_Storytelling

Storytelling is central to marketing.  Susan Gunelius contributed a great article to Forbes in 2013 that is still a great read five years later.  While many of the platforms have evolved, her  “five secrets that brand storytellers understand and use to intrigue, engage, and connect emotionally with consumers” all still apply.

Click here to discover the “Five Secrets.”

Einstein’s Simplify Wisdom: June 2018 Thoughts That Count from NextLevel Thinking

“If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.”

-Albert Einstein

Continue reading Einstein’s Simplify Wisdom: June 2018 Thoughts That Count from NextLevel Thinking

Happy Father’s Day from NextLevel Thinking

Happy Father’s Day

Happy Father’s Day!  In time yore, the ultimate mother threat was, “Just wait till your father gets home.”  Meant to instill terror in a child’s heart, it usually succeeded because father was that big scary person brought in to apply consequences when mother’s authority was undermined.

Thank God that has changed, at least in most families.  To today’s child, the phrase instills pleasure instead of fear.  I wonder how many fathers realize that anticipation of their homecoming is often the highlight of their children’s day.  Don’t believe this?  Okay, let’s explain it.

Wait till your father comes home means the security of knowing you have a father when half the kids in your class don’t.  And it means knowing he will come home, when this is an uncertainty among your friends.  It means you are special enough to make him want to come home to you.  It means you are more important to him than all those other things he could be doing…drinking with his friends, working out, going to a baseball game without you, etc.

Wait till your father comes home means he will be home to answer your endless questions, especially the how’s and where’s and whys, as in, “How do butterflies know when to come out of the cocoon?” and “Where does the white go when the snow melts?” and  “Why do I have to go?”  As you get older and struggle with acne, then income tax forms, and maybe broken hearts or marriages, he’s still there to answer your questions.

Wait till your father comes home means relief from and for Mom who has run out of patience, energy and answers to, “Now what can I do?”  Dad means dangling on the knee, wrestling on the floor, and working on the car together. It means a new parent to badger, and new gender to enjoy, and a new body to cuddle up next to when you’ve all run out of ideas and pep.

Wait till your father comes home means, sometimes, the delicious thought of being invited to a game, a workout, or a fishing trip with him, that wonderful “out with Dad” experience that most kids dream of but rarely get, especially if you’re a girl.  Being out with Dad means being treated like a miniature grownup and it doesn’t end with the outing because you play it over and over in your mind for weeks, bragging to friends, “When my dad and I went…” and they listen with wistful envy.

Wait till your father comes home means, sometimes, a long wait, if he’s out of town on business, in the military on duty, or in the hospital with complications.  You’re afraid he might forget what you look like because he becomes fuzzy to you but you know he won’t because dads don’t forget like kids do.  Sometimes you think he’s never coming back but you know he will because he’s your father and he’ll bring you something, too.  And he’ll say how big you’ve grown and how proud he is of you and you forgive him for being away.

Finally, wait till your father comes home means that when his big scary hairy body shrinks and wears out, and God calls him to live with Him in His eternal love, you know you have a special ally up there, rooting for you, because he always has.  You know, deep down, death won’t stop him from loving you.  And you come to know that you aren’t alone – God has been waiting for your father to come home , too.

Written by Dolores Curran, a mother of three children, who lives in Littleton, Colorado.  The article was published on June 2, 1995 and sent to Eric Poerschke by his mother to wish him a Happy Father’s Day.

Happy Memorial Day from NextLevel Thinking!

Happy Memorial Day from NextLevel Thinking!
When having a Happy Memorial Day, please consider this quote:
Freedom does not come without a price. We may sometimes take for granted the many liberties we enjoy in America, but they have all been earned through the ultimate sacrifice paid by so many of the members of our armed forces.”
-Charles Dent
NLT Memorial Day Final copy

While the first commemorative Memorial Day events weren’t held in the United States until the late 19th century, the practice of honoring those who have fallen in battle dates back thousands of years. The ancient Greeks and Romans held annual days of remembrance for loved ones (including soldiers) each year, festooning their graves with flowers and holding public festivals and feasts in their honor. In Athens, public funerals for fallen soldiers were held after each battle, with the remains of the dead on display for public mourning before a funeral procession took them to their internment in the Kerameikos, one of the city’s most prestigious cemeteries. One of the first known public tributes to war dead was in 431 B.C., when the Athenian general and statesman Pericles delivered a funeral oration praising the sacrifice and valor of those killed in the Peloponnesian War—a speech that some have compared in tone to Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address.